Viper Setup Guide

If you want to get started with Viper, you have come to the right place! The following is a step-by-step of how to get a midi trigger working for Viper.

For the demo, I will be using a Pro Tools session on Mac, with a very artistic video I made of a screen saver. I will start in timecode view, grid mode and using the multitool.

First thing to do is to make a new track for Viper:

Viper must go on an instrument track in Pro Tools:

Here is our new instrument track:

Let’s give it a name.

Then we will add Viper to it.

Viper’s two windows appear. The plugin window lets you customize the wipe and the transparent window display it.

Let’s move the transparent window over the video:

…and move the plugin window out of the way of our track:

We’ll make a marker to show where we want our wipe to hit. We have left the wipe duration at 2 seconds so we’ll need to trigger the wipe 2 seconds before this marker.

Okay, here’s where we’re aiming for our actor to start speaking.

Let’s zoom in to create our wipe midi region.

To create our midi note, we’ll use the pencil tool:

…and we’ll change the track view to ‘notes’:

Using the pencil tool, we’ll draw any midi note of any length. Viper will be triggered by the start of the note only.

Now, we can go back to ‘clips’ view to sync up our new midi clip.

Because we have been working in grid mode, our note is nicely lined up to the frame. Now, we need to make the clip 2 seconds long. (Technically, the clip can be any length, as long as the note is 2 seconds before the end.)

We’ll go back to the multitool.

And we’ll cut our clip at the start of the midi note (key command: a).

If we select the clip, we see it is 1 second and 13 frames long. We want it to be 2 seconds long.

…so, we’ll change our selection to 2 seconds.

…and press enter.

We’ll consolidate our selection into a 2 second clip.

We now have our midi trigger clip, with a midi note which starts two seconds before the end of the clip.

It’s so beautiful, we’ll have to name it.

We’ll probably save this clip into our template, so this is nicer than ‘Viper-02’.

So now, we put our cursor where we want the wipe to hit – on our marker.

Then, we cmd + ctrl + click (using the hand tool) on our clip to align the end of it with the cursor.

Now we are ready to hit play and see our wipe in action.

We hit play and watch as the playhead passes over the midi note and starts the wipe. The two lines meet neatly on our marker and our actor starts to speak.

And that’s it!

Here’s the whole process in a GIF:

And you can grab my Pro Tools session here.

As always, for any questions please get in touch here. If you want to try Viper, you can find it here.

Metadata Software

by VennAdmin

When producing sound effects for a sound effect library, you tag your sound effects with metadata to allow sound designers to find what they want more easily, using sound library software. Without this metadata, the file names could end up very long…

“What does Venn use to tag metadata in sound effects?”

The most technical software we could find!
http://bwfmetaedit.sourceforge.net/

BWF MetaEdit gives you the most control we have found over all the kinds of metadata in your sound, including metadata saved automatically by certain software.

“What about on-set recordings?”

For recordings to be synced with video, Sound Devices’ Wave Agent is excellent. Wave Agent uses tags in the ‘description’ field to store metadata about scene, take, frame rate, channel name, etc. This can then be read by the DAW.

Unfortunately, you cannot use Wave Agent and BWF MetaEdit together very well. While Wave Agent will show this:

WaveAgentMetadata

BWF MetaEdit will show this:

BWFMetadata

Any suggestions of other software to use? Leave a comment!

 

Dialogue Editing Part 4

by VennAdmin

Part four of our series on dialogue editing is here! Watch the video to check out my editing style for dialogue driven scenes. This video uses a scene produced by Arts Educational Schools as showreel material for Henry Gibbs, Arman Mantella and Nicole Sawyerr. If you’re in the business of hiring actors, check out their spotlight links in the description.

If you’ve got some ideas of alternate ways to do things, put them in the comments!

Dialogue Editing Part 3

by VennAdmin

Part three of our series on dialogue editing is here! Watch the video to check out my editing style for dialogue driven scenes. This video uses a scene produced by Arts Educational Schools as showreel material for Henry Gibbs, Arman Mantella and Nicole Sawyerr. If you’re in the business of hiring actors, check out their spotlight links in the description.

If you’ve got some ideas of alternate ways to do things, put them in the comments!

Dialogue Editing Part 2

by VennAdmin

Part two of our series on dialogue editing is here! Watch the video to check out my editing style for dialogue driven scenes. This video uses a scene produced by Arts Educational Schools as showreel material for Henry Gibbs, Arman Mantella and Nicole Sawyerr. If you’re in the business of hiring actors, check out their spotlight links in the description.

If you’ve got some ideas of alternate ways to do things, put them in the comments!

Dialogue Editing Tutorial Part 1

by VennAdmin

Part one of our series on dialogue editing is here! Watch the video to check out my editing style for dialogue driven scenes. This video uses a scene produced by Arts Educational Schools as showreel material for Henry Gibbs, Arman Mantella and Nicole Sawyerr. If you’re in the business of hiring actors, check out their spotlight links in the description.

If you’ve got some ideas of alternate ways to do things, put them in the comments!

Interleaving and Splitting with Wave Agent

by VennAdmin

Sound Devices produces a nice little program called Wave Agent mainly for producing sound report sheets out of metadata generated by their field recorders. But it also has a few other useful little functions… combine these with batch renaming and you have a powerful combination…

You will need:
Wave Agent by Sound Devices.
Batch renaming software. In this example, I use Adobe Bridge.
Some audio files.

For this example, I will demonstrate how Wave Agent and Adobe Bridge can make the file structure that the Zoom H6 uses to record more manageable. This also works great if you choose the wrong setting in an Edirol r44.

Let’s say I recorded 10 takes using 4 inputs, to 4 separate files, and now I want them as 10 4-channel wavs.
Blog1-01

Well, we don’t need the .hprj files, and all the .wavs have unique names, so let’s put them all in the same folder.

Blog1-02

Search the folder containing all the recordings and their folders for .wav files and pop them into a new folder.

Blog1-03

Then, using your batch renaming software of choice (newer versions of OSX have a batch rename function), rename them how you want. The key thing is that they must end with something like ‘_1’, ‘_2’, ‘_3’ and ‘_4’. Wave Agent recognises the underscore and the channel name.

Blog1-04

In this case, I just removed all the ‘Tr’s.

Blog1-04b

Then, open up Wave Agent.

Blog1-05

And import your audio.

Blog1-06

As you can see, it recognises them as 10 tracks of 4 channels, even though they are actually 40 files. So, click split/combine.

Blog1-07

Don’t be worried by the massive table, because Wave Agent has recognised our files as 4 channel audio, it can combine the files automatically. Just set your destination using the ‘…’ button on the right and hit ‘process’.

Blog1-08

In no time at all, you’ll have a set of files like this. Use another batch rename to get rid of all the numbers and underscores, and you should have some convenient multichannel audio.Blog1-10

Wave Agent can be used for a few other things as well – you can interleave .wav files from a Pro Tools session working in ‘multiple mono’ mode, separate polywavs, or edit metadata.